Soil health is becoming a common phrase in Indiana. When you see someone no-tilling and using cover crops, you think about soil health. Just how important is soil health, and how can it impact your farm?

Rick Clark of Clark Land and Cattle, Williamsport, Ind., thinks soil health can completely change how you farm. He and his family are proving this as they continually adjust their farming practices.

Soil health is becoming a common phrase in Indiana. When you see someone no-tilling and using cover crops, you think about soil health. Just how important is soil health, and how can it impact your farm?

Rick Clark of Clark Land and Cattle, Williamsport, Ind., thinks soil health can completely change how you farm. He and his family are proving this as they continually adjust their farming practices.

“We began no-tilling and utilizing cover crops 10 years ago,” he says. “We started planting green into cover crops soon afterward. We believe it’s helping us reduce crop inputs and become more efficient and more profitable.”

However, Clark is the first to insert a word of caution when he talks to groups or when farmers visit his farm. “You just don’t go out and do the things we’re doing and trying the very first year you try no-till and cover crops,” he says. “It can take five years or so before you might feel confident with doing some of these things. We’re proving to ourselves that it works for us, but it might not be right for everyone.”

Read More: https://www.farmprogress.com/crops/when-soil-health-guides-decision